er-lb-6-heroine-rehabNo other drug or illicit substance can strike fear into the hearts of many in the same tenacity as heroin does. Many individuals already recognize the futility of obtaining help for someone who is addicted to heroin. However, if there’s one question that almost everyone want to ask is that if a heroin addict is ever going to recover.

Getting addicted to heroin can perhaps be the most dangerous thing that can ever happen to someone. The drug is unusually habit-forming with an increased risk for fatal overdose. It has been known that even so-called pros can succumb to the devastating effects of this illicit substance if they miscalculate their dose or they simply have a not-so-good experience. Helping heroin addicts requires the services of highly qualified and duly certified heroin addiction treatment facilities.

Understanding Heroin

Heroin belongs to a class of substances known as opioids of which morphine is the most medically-important and most popular member. Morphine has been the drug of choice when it comes to the management of severe intractable pain. It is one of the most potent painkillers of all time; so potent that it is believed people as early as the 15th century have been using morphine to help manage pain. Unfortunately, even during those times there were already indications that morphine was a highly addicting drug.

Heroin is not used in medicine in the management of pain, unlike morphine where it is often used in severe pain syndromes. Nevertheless, both morphine and heroin share strikingly similar properties. They both produce the same euphoric feelings that people addicted to heroin consider as one of the best effects of the drug. Regrettably, over time, the individual develops tolerance for heroin such that the usual dose simply isn’t providing the expected benefits anymore. The only way to obtain the benefits is to increase the dose of the heroin or to increase the frequency of its taking or even both. If the person decides not to take heroin at this point, he goes through a very painful withdrawal process. So, heroin addicts who want to stop using heroin eventually find themselves using it again because they cannot stand the severity of the withdrawal symptoms. That’s why it is imperative to obtain treatment from a medical facility so that the individual can manage the withdrawal symptoms and reduce the likelihood of drug relapse.

Why People Get Addicted to Heroin

There’s no doubt that heroin is a very addicting substance. What makes it very addictive is its uncanny ability to bind to the different cells, primarily opiate receptors found in the brain, the spinal cord, and the digestive tract. However, what really separates heroin from the rest is the swiftness of the establishment of the receptor connections. Within minutes, addicts can already feel its effects such as drowsiness, feelings of happiness, and euphoria.

Regrettably, because heroin attaches to the different receptors of the central nervous system, it can also depress the function of this all-important system in the body. Heroin is a known central nervous system depressant and as such respiratory depression is one of the most common culprits why people lose their lives in cases of heroin overdose.

Why Heroin is Dangerous

Heroin overdose can produce a host of complications as well as an increased risk of fatal overdose. Part of the danger of using heroin is the greatly differing potency of the drug. It is possible that the fluctuating levels of potency can lead to heroin overdose in instances where a substantially high-purity heroin was injected into the veins.

Once the heroin has reached the bloodstream, the person can instantly feel euphoria which can make him forget about everything. This is followed by extreme drowsiness owing to the CNS depressant effects of heroin. One of the most common side effects of heroin is nausea followed by vomiting. With a decreased level of consciousness, some individuals have been known to choke on the vomitus that have accumulated in their throats. This leads to airway obstruction leading to respiratory arrest.

Getting Professional Help for Heroin Addiction

The dangers of heroin overdose and addiction are simply too great to overlook. As such, getting professional help is a must if you want to reverse the effects of this particular drug and regain control of your life.

It starts with detoxification where the painful withdrawal symptoms are systematically managed. These withdrawal symptoms can be in the form of hallucinations, nausea and vomiting, pain, aggression, tremors, seizures, and irritability. This allows the person to successfully navigate through the different withdrawal symptoms without having to resort to taking heroin. This is because, as the person is no longer taking heroin, there will be very few if not totally absent sources of pleasure which may dampen his resolve to get better. This combination of lack of pleasure and severe withdrawal symptoms is what’s keeping many heroin addicts from successfully completing their heroin addiction recovery. That is why treatment must always be performed under the auspices of a comprehensive heroin addiction treatment program. And detox is just a part of the overall recovery process.

The goal of heroin treatment is to help you lead a life that is free from drugs. This often entails equipping you with all the right tools and competencies that will enable you to manage your own problems without having to use any form of addicting substance like heroin. These can be ensured through a variety of scientifically-proven techniques and methods that are designed specifically to help you get rid of heroin from your life forever. While there are many heroin addiction treatment and rehabilitation facilities out there, it is critical to choose only those that espouse evidence-based drug addiction principles and protocols as these provide you with the best chances of getting better. While social addiction rehab models may help, they should not form the basis of your treatment.

It is equally important to look for heroin addiction treatment centers that can provide you with an excellent continuity of care. It should be apparent by now that recovering from heroin addiction takes more than just 2 weeks of staying in a facility. Recovery is a lifelong process.

Heroin addiction treatment professionals are here to help you or someone you care about. You only need to get in touch with these professionals so you can now start embarking on a journey of addiction-free life.